There are few places in the world that can cram so much history, scenery, and culture as the United Kingdom. However, I know a lot of you already live here, but I think that many of us take it for granted! It is busy, eccentric and such a unique destination, where thriving cities like London, Glasgow and Manchester are mixed with quiet landscapes like the peaks of Snowdonia and the slopes of the Highlands.

With this region being such a vast area, there are plenty of things or offer which will suffice a trip to any part of the United Kingdom. So, I have decided to start a UK travel series, so that we can all appreciate where we live a little more.

One of my favourite places in the UK in Bath, so I thought I would kick off the series with this historical city.

Overview

When you arrive in Bath, you can feel like you have stepped back in time. The majority of the buildings are made from the local, golden-coloured, Bath Stone which gives this city such an iconic reputation. It is a sophisticated city with an array of fabulous restaurants, shops and bars, making it an ideal destination for all ages. Maybe famous, due to natural hot springs, an abbey and incredible architecture, it is one of my favourite cities in the UK.

Visit the Roman Baths

Bath sometimes lies in the shadow of many of the other major cities in the UK, but it is a beautiful city which is steeped in history, and this is shown through the incredible Roman Baths. This attraction is Bath’s most famous, and what draws in many of its visitors. Bath was founded upon natural hot springs with the steaming water playing a key role throughout its history. Lying in the heart of the city the Roman Baths were constructed around 70 AD as a grand bathing and socialising complex. It is now one of the best-preserved Roman remains in the world!

Today, the Great Bath is open to the skies and possibly even more eye-catching than it was back then. The weathered pillars which surround the main rectangle are stunning, and the water is still steaming hot! The open-air terrace above is outlined with statues of Roman emperors and statesmen, and with Victorian additions carved in 1894.

What to see at the Roman Baths:

  • The Sacred Spring
  • The Roman Temple
  • The Roman Baths
  • A museum

Thermae Bath Spa  

Located in the heart of the city, the Thermae Bath Spa is an award-winning natural spa. You can bathe in the mineral-rich water as the Celts and Romans did over 2,000 years ago. Their open-air rooftop pool is one of its best features, as it offers spectacular views across the city. There are lots of sessions to choose including 40 spa treatments and packages.

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey stands magnificently in the city centre with its stained-glass windows, columns and architecture. The abbey has been a place of Christian worship on this site for over 1,200 years and remains very much a living church today with services taking place throughout the entire week. The inside of the abbey is equally as striking as the outside, and is well worth a visit when you are in the area!

The Royal Crescent

If you love architecture, or just want to see one of Bath’s most famous attractions, The Royal Crescent is perfect for you! Built in between 1767 and 1775 and designed by John Wood, the Younger, this remarkable landmark forms a sweeping crescent of 30 Grade I Listed terrace houses and is, without a doubt, one of the greatest examples of Georgian architecture anywhere in the UK.

My Travel Tips

  • Walk everywhere: Bath is beautiful, and there is loads to see!
  • Find ‘off-the-beaten-track’ restaurants: some of the best eateries can be found down hidden streets.
  • Visit the Roman Baths either early or late: as it is one of Bath’s most popular attractions, it is best to visit either first thing or towards the end of the day.
  • Look at buying joint tickets: many of the attractions on Bath require tickets, so you can save money by buying joint attraction tickets.

Have you visited Bath before? Let me know what your favourite thing to do by leaving a comment below!

Image credit: Velvet and Heather Cowper

 

 

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